Customer Service

When is the “positive sandwich” appropriate to use?

Posted: 11th June, 2018 in Case Studies, Customer Service, Marketing Services, Sales , Tips & Tricks, Training and mentoring

Many people will be familiar with the concept of the “positive sandwich” and others may wonder what it is? 

Rather like a sandwich, the two pieces of bread represent positive feedback whilst the filling sitting in the middle signifies the negative comment or corrective action needed. 

Often, people use it to give someone negative feedback and make suggestions in the management of employees, in sales and customer service. 

I fully understand some people are sceptical of the concept, believing it may come across as pandering, false or by watering down the problem, making it an ineffective tool. It may be impractical at times, but I think this happens when we use it incorrectly or in the wrong circumstances.

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Be prepared to join the customer’s team

Posted: 22nd March, 2018 in Case Studies, Customer Service, Marketing Services, PR & press, Sales , Tips & Tricks, Training and mentoring

Over the years, when people asked what I worked at and I told them “sales” I reckon that sometimes they would conjure a picture in their heads of dodgy characters such as “Delboy” (Only Fools and Horses), “Arthur Daley” (Minder) or even Jordan Belfort (the Wolf of Wall Street).

Although pushy people like these gave sales a bad name, I knew it wasn’t personal. I am thankful that sales has developed a lot over the years where we now focus on “relationship selling” by putting the customer at the centre of the experience. This has taught me the importance of living by key principles which I would like to share with you:

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Do you believe in your product or service?  A question we all need to ask ourselves

Posted: 22nd November, 2017 in Customer Service, Marketing Services, PR & press, Tips & Tricks, Training and mentoring

Repeatedly, I hear people talk about the about the importance of believing in your product or service in order to be successful in sales.  It’s a strong statement and one I firmly agree with, because if we don’t believe, how can we convince someone else to buy?

Customers need to know they can trust us. If we are not convinced, people will see through us and we may come across as dubious and untrustworthy.

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Acknowledging the customer, before taking action

Posted: 20th October, 2017 in Case Studies, Customer Service, Sales , Tips & Tricks, Training and mentoring

Do you know that feeling when you are sitting in a restaurant on a Saturday night with a group of family and friends checking out the menu and wondering what you will order?

You decide on a steak and order it medium to well done. Twenty minutes later the waiter comes back to the table with your food. At this stage, you’re really hungry and looking forward to your meal. However, your enthusiasm is curtailed, when you cut into the meat and discover the steak is rare.  So, you call the waiter over, explain the situation and tell them you would like it a little more done.

The waiter stops momentarily, listens and says “right, okay, I’ll take it back”. They quickly lift the plate, turn around and dash back to the kitchen. All of this happens in less than 5 seconds.

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Three phrases guaranteed to upset customers

Posted: 4th July, 2017 in Case Studies, Customer Service, Marketing Services, Sales , Tips & Tricks, Training and mentoring

Often when we are talking to a customer, everything seems to be going well and then something changes. You can almost feel the temperature in the room drop and there is a chill in the conversation. The other person’s attitude becomes a little defensive or clipped and we wonder what could possibly have gone wrong?

Without even realising it, our knee jerk reaction kicks in and we become a little defensive. We begin to believe the customer is overreacting, a little unreasonable or just wants everything their own way.

How often do we stop and look at things objectively? Do we ever stop and think that perhaps it was something we might have said that upset them? 

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